Health Problems And Poverty

Health Problems And Poverty

Low income is associated with health risks such as inadequate nutrition, damp and unsanitary housing and social exclusion. There are strong links between income and health as they determine the opportuity for families and individuals to thrive. One-third of Canadian workers hold insecure jobs of short duration. These jobs are much more likely to be linked to ill health such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, mental illness and long-onset diabetes. Amongst Canadians, 24% of the years of life lost from disease are due to income shortcomings. 

People that are experiencing homelessness suffer from a wide range of medical problems. Disease severity can be remarkably high because of factors such as extreme poverty, delays in seeking care, non-adherence to therapy, cognitive impairment and the adverse health effects of homelessness itself. People living on the street are particularly prone to develop skin diseases such as cellulitis, impetigo, venous stasis disease,scabies and body lice. Foot disorders such as onychomycosis, tinea pedis, corns and callouses, and immersion foot result from inadequate footwear, prolonged exposure to moisture, long periods of walking and standing, and repetitive minor trauma.